Architectural Heritage 27 results
  • Somogyi Library

    Károly Somogyi, prebendary of Esztergom, aimed to make a contribution to the 'mental' reconstruction of the city in ruins after the flood by giving Szeged his priceless collection of books in 1881.
  • Márer House

    Owing to the playfulness, extravagant animation and asymmetry of the facade, this beautifully renovated building is a unique example of the geometric Art Nouveau.
  • Protestant Church

    The building designed by Frigyes Schulek, completed in 1884, is also called the 'Cockerel church' owing to the figure decorating its tower.
  • Reformed Church Palace

    he palace attracts our attention mainly owing to its position in the cityscape and of course, to its spectacular facade as well as to its unusual siting.
  • Schäffer Palace

    The current sight of the Schäffer Palace confronts us indeed with how much Szeged’s cityscape ...
  • Raichl House

    The architect’s palace in Szeged is larger and more imposingly executed, yet it is more modest in comparison with its counterpart in Subotica, failing to reach its outstanding unity of style and the elaboration of its details.
  • New Synagogue

    "Love your neighbour as yourself." The biblical commandment can be read in Hebrew and Hungarian ...
  • Goldschmidt Palace

    Today nobody would think that this undistinctive and characterless apartment house once was one of the most remarkable buildings of the Szeged Art Nouveau.
  • Old Synagogue

    The nicely preserved monument built between 1837 and 843 was created by the Lipovszky brothers, Henrik and József.
  • Alsóvárosi Church

    The Franciscan church dedicated to Our Lady of the Snows and the cloister nearby are precious architectural heritages of Szeged.
  • Votive Church

    After the Great Flood (1879) destroying the city, the people of Szeged made an oath to build a majestic catholic church.
  • Musical clock

    The tunes of this unique piece of art by watchmaker Ferenc Csúri could be first heard at the Open Air Festival in 1936.